Analogue Unreality Autopsy
Babalon: Typhonian Priestess

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"Venus in Furs"

Model: Sasha Sweet

Photographer: B. William 

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"Venus in Furs (Alternate)"

Model: Sasha Sweet

Photographer: B. William 

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"Auto-Abyssmal Masturbation Techniques"

Model: Sasha Sweet

Photographer: B. William 

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"Blood Sigil" 

Model: Sasha Sweet

Photographer: B. William 

I’m going to cover this, but change most of the lyrics. Would that still be considered a cover? 

Last night Edgar Cayce visited me and told me that LAM, not Adam Weishaupt, was the true founder of the Illuminati. To-night I get Knighted at Scottish Rite. Heil thee almighty-illuminated ‘G’!

Rozz Williams: Hollywood Forever, Chapel Columbarium (2nd floor)

To-day being the anniversary of his exit from this plane of existence, I walked over to the Hollywood Forever Cemetery and the plot in which a small portion of Rozz’s ashes are kept, along with an original piece of his collage art, lyrics to a song, and a picture of him on the set of the experimental short-film Pig. The Chapel Columbarium boasts a very lovely setting, and the second floor is aloft the chapel for the funeral services, so I enjoyed the melancholy funeral music while gazing at all of the beautifully-flowered plots. 

 

 The picture was taken while on the set for the filming of Pig (1998). “All truth is parallel, all truth is untrue.” Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs were both quoted as saying, “Nothing is true. Everything is Permitted.” 

The funerary urn was specifically designed for Rozz with ‘1334’ and various other symbols such as a scorpion on the right side (not shown), as Rozz was a Scorpio. 


'1334' written by either a close friend or fan. From this angle, the scorpion on the right side of the funerary urn is somewhat viewable. 


The dead rose was left by me. 


With the sunlight casting a reflection on the glass in the afternoon, it was too difficult to capture a better photograph of the original piece of artwork, so I scanned a copy of the same piece from the book, The Art of Rozz Williams: FROM CHRISTIAN DEATH TO DEATH. The piece is entitled ‘Untitled’ (below) and was created in ‘93 with paper collage. It was very exciting for me to see the original piece up close and personal, as his collage work has always been inexplicably inspirational to me and my own work.  

The written piece on the right of the plot is what seems to be the original copy of the lyrics to “December 30, 1334” from The Whorese’s Mouth spoken word album (1997). The title "Suicide Note" is blacked out with marker at the top of the paper. There are also other markings on the paper, such as circled words (like ‘firery’) and a few grammatical corrections with pen. “December 30, 1334” ironically reads like a suicide note, with the opening line: “By the time you hear this message, I’ll be gone…” The poem in its entirety is wonderfully emotional, sad, and extraordinary all at the same time. A sort of revengeful suicide note from someone that has passed beyond that which is mundane.

Of all the plots on the second floor of the Chapel Columbarium, Rozz’s plot is the clearly the most artistic, undoubtedly the way in which Rozz would have liked it to be. 

Rozz Williams (November 6, 1963- April 1, 1998). Fourteen years ago, this day, Rozz hanged himself in his Hollywood apartment. 
For as long as I can remember, I’ve always dedicated this day to the artist that has been an incredible lifelong inspiration to me in every facet of life. I even have the numbers ‘1334’ tattooed on my wrist to pay my homage. Over the years I’ve had the opportunity to become good friends with many of the families that were involved with the death rock band Christian Death, and Rozz is still, to this day, in the hearts and minds of many who knew him and appreciated his work as an artist. “Forget me not or I’ll forget myself…”

Rozz Williams (November 6, 1963- April 1, 1998). Fourteen years ago, this day, Rozz hanged himself in his Hollywood apartment. 

For as long as I can remember, I’ve always dedicated this day to the artist that has been an incredible lifelong inspiration to me in every facet of life. I even have the numbers ‘1334’ tattooed on my wrist to pay my homage. Over the years I’ve had the opportunity to become good friends with many of the families that were involved with the death rock band Christian Death, and Rozz is still, to this day, in the hearts and minds of many who knew him and appreciated his work as an artist. “Forget me not or I’ll forget myself…”

Tentacle sex toys. Kenneth Grant and H.P. Lovecraft would be so proud! According to the Whipspider Rubberworks home page, requests for custom work are also available. Daemonic horns would be kind of interesting…

Tentacle sex toys. Kenneth Grant and H.P. Lovecraft would be so proud! According to the Whipspider Rubberworks home page, requests for custom work are also available. Daemonic horns would be kind of interesting…

One of my many obsessions as an amateur occult historian & librarian at my home Masonic Lodge is sifting through old black and white photographs of the various women involved in the occult over the years, most particularly the women of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. There are many beautiful photographs of Florence Farr (my personal favorite), Annie Horniman, Maude Gonne, and Mina Bergson Mathers, just to name a few. However after recently reading Aleister Crowley’s short fiction story entitled, ‘At the Fork of the Roads’— about a black magic curse gone wrong— I was introduced to Althea Gyles, the Irish illustrator close to W.B. Yeats, and member of the Hermetic Order of the G.D. There was just this very interesting magical aura to the women involved in esoterica back then. I have such a soft spot for girls that know their Goetia!

One of my many obsessions as an amateur occult historian & librarian at my home Masonic Lodge is sifting through old black and white photographs of the various women involved in the occult over the years, most particularly the women of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. There are many beautiful photographs of Florence Farr (my personal favorite), Annie Horniman, Maude Gonne, and Mina Bergson Mathers, just to name a few. However after recently reading Aleister Crowley’s short fiction story entitled, ‘At the Fork of the Roads’— about a black magic curse gone wrong— I was introduced to Althea Gyles, the Irish illustrator close to W.B. Yeats, and member of the Hermetic Order of the G.D. There was just this very interesting magical aura to the women involved in esoterica back then. I have such a soft spot for girls that know their Goetia!

Excited for to-night! Psychic TV @ the Echoplex! This will be my first time seeing Genesis since the death of Lady Jaye. S/he should be phantastik as always!

Excited for to-night! Psychic TV @ the Echoplex! This will be my first time seeing Genesis since the death of Lady Jaye. S/he should be phantastik as always!

H.P. Lovecraft: Myth-Maker

     One commonly misunderstood perception in the Lovecraft oeuvre has been the proposed inadequacy of familiarized assertion left over by Lovecraft’s most well-known disciple and correspondent— and alleged “posthumous collaborator”— August Derleth. Best known for the all-together preservation of his mentor’s written body of work, Derleth was, for the most part, unwilling to understand the essence of Lovecraft’s complex pseudomythology. Disseminating his own Judaeo-Christian viewpoint, perhaps partly due to his Catholic background, Derleth created a distorted self-interpretation of what he termed Lovecraft’s well-known “Cthulhu Mythos”. First off, Derleth viewed Cthulhu as a water elemental, not realizing the being’s presence of wings, (probably somehow taken from the extraterrestrial’s imprisonment in his watery grave in the sunken city of R’lyeh), altogether coming to the arbitrary hypothesis that Cthulhu is an aquatic being! More importantly however, Cthulhu is described by Lovecraft as only a “cousin” of the Old Ones in the Necronomicon—  included in the “Dunwich Horror”—and is portrayed by Lovecraft himself as one of the weakest and least significant of the main entities involved in his overall cosmic pseudomythology. Derleth made it a point to place a pivotal amount of importance on the being, becoming strangely enamored with him, bestowing upon Lovecraft’s pseudomythology the singularly inappropriate sobriquet “Cthulhu Mythos”. Moreover, Derleth wrote countless pseudo-Cthuluoid pastiches, collected in The Mask of Cthulhu and The Trail of Cthulhu

     There is a splendid essay written by Dirk W. Mosig entitiled H.P. Lovecraft: Myth-Maker published in S.T. Joshi’s ‘H.P. Lovecraft: Four Decades of Criticism’ (1980).                       

     In it, Mosig proposes that the inadequacies labeled “Cthulhu Mythos” be permanently disregarded, prefering to call it the Yog-Sothoth Cycle of Myth, to differentiate it from the distorted version labelled by Derleth. I must say, that as an avid Lovecraftian and amateur occult historian, my preliminary opinion of August Derleth was rather “skewed”. Clearly not as talented a writer as his mentor, Derleth’s supposed “posthumous collaborations” are less imaginative and rather dull, evident in Derleth’s Cthulhu-obsessed writings. Unable to share Lovecraft’s bleak cosmic vision, Derleth “conceived instead an anthropocentred universe, wherein benevolent Elder Gods and malevolent Old Ones would engage in ludicrous battles for the sake and welfare of man, much in the same way as the Judaeo-Christian God and his angels confronted Lucifer and his daemonic hordes.” As Mosig explains, …”while Lovecraft’s hapless protagonists were left alone and defenceless in their chilling confrontations with an incomprehensible Reality, Derleth supplied his heroes with ridiculous star-stone amulets which played the role of garlic and the crucifix in the hackneyed vampire tale, not to mention interventions by rescuing Elder Gods which arrived with a timing reminiscent of the U.S. Calvary in cheap Western films.”

     Of all the criticisms directed at Lovecraft’s pseudomythology over the years, clearly Mosig understood Lovecraft’s vision. Mosig goes onto explain that the Old Ones “were, are, and will be. They are not mere symbols of the power of evil, although they may appear to be inimical to man, in the same way that man would appear to be inimical to ants, should these get in the way. The Old Ones are above and beyond mankind— they transcend man, and care no more to him than he does for ants.” While August Derleth was more or less enamored by the so-called “Byronic hero,” Lovecraft had a more bleak vision of the universe, whereas such things as organic life, good and evil, and love and hate were habitually nonexistent to Lovecraft. For anything with such mundane attributes within the “negligible and temporary race called mankind”, didn’t have any existence at all! 

     To make light of the subject, Mosig concludes his essay by basically laughing at what the “Cthulhu Mythos” have become in a contemporary Lovecraftian literary world. Mosig states, “…How many would-be Lovecraft pastichists inadvertently would up imitating Derleth’s own inferior imitations! Hopefully the trend will be reversed in the future, now that the facts are out in the open!” With the obvious exception of Kenneth Grant however, the “Cthulhu Mythos” have continued to exert an artificial “story within a story” per se, of Lovecraft’s writings, with the misconception that the Elder Gods are a race of superhuman gods fighting to save the world against the manelovent extraterrestrial (or extracosmical; whatever you want to call them!) villains known to mankind as the Outer Ones. Those supposed terrible entities written about by the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred! Perhaps it is best, however misinterpreted it may be, as the true followers of weird fiction know best. I’ve just grown to learn that when popularized, things become twisted, distorted, and bent out of its original shape. At first, my inclination was to direct annoyance upon the contemporary generation of Cthuluoid readers, however it was August Derleth’s decision to steal from his mentor, and when in denial, attribute the “Cthulhu Mythos” unto his own self-actualized creation. The misconception that Lovecraft had anything to do with contemporary society’s misunderstanding of August Derleth’s Cthulhu worship is not surprising, as H.P. Lovecraft himself had difficulty in understanding his own cosmic pseudomythology, or should I say Yog-Sothoth Cycle of Myth?